Pendleton

331 SE 2nd Street, Pendleton, OR 97801 (Map)
Phone: 541.276.6207
Fax:      541.276.4628

Hours: Monday – Wednesday 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

 

Lifeways’ Pendleton Outpatient office provides a comprehensive range of outpatient behavioral health services.

These include:

  • Children’s Day Treatment
    • Specialty referral required
  • Adult, Child, & Family Therapy
  • Skills Training
  • Case Management
  • Peer Support
  • Group Sessions
  • Psychiatric Medication Prescribing
  • 24-hour Crisis Intervention
  • Representative Payee Services
  • Supported Employment Services
  • Early Assessment & Support Alliance (EASA)
    • See Lifeways.org for additional information
  • School-Based Services
  • Assertive Community Treatment (ACT)
  • Jail Diversion

Providers

Micaela CatheyRebecca MooreDan Wilcox

Meet Micaela! She is the Executive Director for both Umatilla and Malheur County here at Lifeways and has been instrumental in ensuring that the mental health services Lifeways provides continues to thrive in North Eastern Oregon.

Micaela has been with Lifeways for 6.5 years and in her current role for roughly a year and a half. Before Lifeways Micaela spent 6 years working in the Idaho prison system within the mental health units and clinics, she is also a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of Oregon.

As for schooling, Micaela attended Boise State University where she earned her Bachelors in Science and a Grad Certificate in Health Leadership. She then went on to Northwest Nazarene University where she earned her Masters in Social work and graduated with full honors!

An interesting tidbit about Micaela and her work is she has progressed from an intern with Lifeways all the way up to where she is now as the Executive Director of the 2 counties Lifeways resides in Oregon.

Meet Rebecca! She is an outstanding Mental Health Specialist III and also part of the Crisis Team that assists in Pendleton, Oregon and the surrounding areas! She received her first job in Mental Health at just 19 years old and worked directly with clients for 7 years before coming to Lifeways.

Rebecca attended Brescia University in Owensboro, Kentucky where she received not only her Bachelors degree in Social Work but also her Masters in  Social Work. She graduated Cum Laude and Phi Alpha from the Social Work Honors Society! After receiving her Bachelors degree is when she started with Lifeways in the Day Treatment Program.

Rebecca credits her work in the Day Treatment Program for giving her the drive and passion to pursue a career in the mental health field, especially with folks going through crisis. “Working in the day treatment taught me so much about trauma and how it affects the brain and the body. That position is what drove my interest in learning as much as possible about trauma, and how we can effectively treat it. Those kids taught me a lot that I now use when working with people in crisis.”

Meet Dan! He is a Crisis Worker for Umatilla County and works out of the Pendleton Outpatient Facility! Dan came to Lifeways after a little under 4 years at Umatilla County Mental Health.

Dan attended a plethora of colleges and university to form the backbone of his experience in mental health and serving the community. He started at Northwestern Christian College before heading to Chemeketa Community College. He earned his Bachelors degree in Bible and Preaching from Puget Sound Christian College before attending The University of Washington, University of Texas at Arlington, Lincoln Christian Seminar, Fuller Seminary, Western Seminary and finally earning his Masters from George Fox in Counseling in 2001. Alongside his Bachelors in Preaching he was voted Most Likely to be a Successful Preacher in 1975.

Aside from being a Crisis worker he is also a Senior Mental Health Investigator and has quite an experience that shows just how well therapy works, “Once I was in court trying to get a woman committed as dangerous to self.  She was quite psychotic and was wandering into traffic.  In the hearing she objected to my being there:  “He cannot testify.  He has been stalking me.  He is a pervert!  He does unimaginable thing to small children!”  Judge Bauer simply looked at me and smiled, then said, “Go on (with your testimony).”  She was committed.  A few weeks later she came up to me at the state hospital (while it was in Pendleton) and asked if I remembered her.  I was afraid she was going to accuse me of something.  Instead she said, “I am doing much better now.  I should be going to a group home in a few days.”